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27 Jun 2018

MEPSEAS project launched to protect South-East Asia marine environment

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"Seven ASEAN countries have formally launched an ambitious initiative aimed at improving the environmental health of the seas in the region, through the implementation of key International Maritime Organization (IMO) marine environment protection treaties. Senior decisions makers of maritime administrations of the beneficiary ASEAN countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam) met for their first high-level regional meeting in Bali, Indonesia (25-27 June), to kick-start the “Marine Environment Protection for Southeast Asia Seas (MEPSEAS) Project”. IMO is implementing the project, with funding from the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad). The ASEAN Maritime Transport Working Group (ASEAN MTWG), the highest regional policy making body dealing with maritime matters in the region, will act as the advisory body for the MEPSEAS project. The four-year MEPSEAS project (2018-2021) will focus on enhancing the countries’ capacity to implement a number of high-priority treaties, including the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL); the Anti-Fouling Systems Convention; the London dumping of wastes at sea convention and protocol; and the Ballast Water Management Convention. The high-level meeting, supported by IMO, was also attended by project strategic partners (Partnerships in Environmental Management for the Seas of East Asia (PEMSEA); Women in Maritime Asia (WIMA ASIA); and the Tokyo MOU regional port State control (PSC) organization); non-beneficiary partner countries, including Singapore; and shipping industry representatives. Opening the meeting, Mr. R. Agus H. Purnomo, Director General for Sea Transportation under Ministry of Transportation, Government of Republic of Indonesia, said that the MEPSEAS project provided an opportunity for the countries to tackle the risks the marine environment faced in the region and support sustainable growth in the maritime sector. “We should work together to ensure a continued and strengthened contribution towards a green economy and growth and to protect our marine environment in a sustainable manner. Our active involvement through the MEPSEAS project will prove that we have the same commitment to protect our marine environment,” Mr. Purnomo said. The meeting plans to agree a Project Work Plan and regional coordination and information sharing arrangements. The MEPSEAS project will promote national legal and policy developments and related capacity building in port and flag state inspections to support enforcement of the selected Conventions. The Project is also expected to support specific port biological baseline survey training, the Green Shipping-Green Port-Green Shipyards (GGG) initiative of the Philippines and the holding of a regional maritime technology conference, among other activities. The MEPSEAS project will build on a previous IMO-Norad foundation project which directly led to the six countries concerned (Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam) making substantial progress in implementing or acceding to IMO environmental treaties. The latest country to join the project is Myanmar, which aims to initiate actions to accede to and implement two marine environmental Conventions in the near future. For countries which have acceded to the relevant treaties, the new MEPSEAS project will allow them to focus on effective implementation. “The MEPSEAS project is a clear demonstration of the continued commitment of the ASEAN countries to move towards a sustainable maritime transport system and to address significant marine environmental issues,” said Jose Matheickal, Deputy Director (Major Projects) of IMO. “The IMO-Norad foundation project was a remarkable success and IMO is once again very proud to partner with Norad, the ASEAN countries and all the strategic partners to build on the foundation project in a regionally-coordinated way,” Mr. Matheickal said. IMO was also represented at the meeting by Ms. Josephine Uranza, who is based in the IMO regional office in Manila, Philippines, and Ms Brenda Pimentel, IMO regional project consultant."

18 Jun 2018

Ship crews undergo basic safety training

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"A GROUP of uncertified ship crew have successfully completed a safety training in Honiara last week. The training was facilitated by Sol-Safety Consultancy and Training Services (SSCTS), which is privately owned by Elijah Mouku. The training was made possible under the support of Solomon Islands Maritime Safety Administration (SIMSA). The training enabled uncertified marines crews who have been employed by local shipping companies throughout Solomon Islands to be trained on safety rules while working on a board.. Following the training the participants obtained a basic maritime safety certificate. During the practical session at Ranadi seafront, East Honiara the participants were able to undergo practical exercises on how to wear life jackets, unfold a life raft, how to jump into the ocean, how to remain as a group while floating and understanding other basic marines equipment. Since the establishment of SSCTS in 2013, it has been providing various training to crews and the latest was on Thursday. Mr Mouku explained the program is to ensure boat crews are qualified before working on the local vessels. “Its important for crews who work in many of these marine’s vessel to get basic safety qualification because it is part of SIMSA reform to see that all marine crews are qualified and must undergo safety training. “So I am here to help our uncertified marine crew to obtain basic marine safety knowledge. “My target is to teach people who work in many local boats ships that haven’t got any basic maritime safety training to have the skills.” He said its important for crews to have safety skills in order of any disaster during their time out at sea. “The five days basic maritime safety training should now give the students the confident to work in any marine vessels.” "

10 May 2018

How Hong Kong shipping lost out to Singapore, and the industry leaders on a mission to raise its profile

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"If all of the 2,360 ocean going ships owned or operated by members of the Hong Kong Shipowners Association were placed stem to stern, the line of vessels would be 260km long. It’s an impressive mental image, but in reality those ships are scattered all around the globe, and little of the southern Chinese city’s impressive sea power and related maritime sector is visible to the public eye. Despite its pivotal role in the emergence of Hong Kong as a global trading centre, dating to the British occupation in 1842, some experts fear shipping is being dismissed as an old-fashioned legacy industry and is in danger of being overlooked by the public. There have even been calls recently to close the city’s busy container terminals and use the land for public housing. On May 12, the Hong Kong Maritime Museum, at Central Pier 8, will launch Nautic Quest, an ambitious programme for maritime learning, aimed at raising awareness among students and the public of Hong Kong’s vibrant port and shipping sector. “The shipping industry has been concerned for about a decade now about how to remind the local community about the value of the maritime sector to Hong Kong,” says museum director Richard Wesley, who sees promoting shipping in the local community as an important part of the museum’s mission. The HK$1.3 million Nautic Quest programme is supported by the Hong Kong Maritime and Port Board’s Maritime and Aviation Training Fund. It includes a new interactive website, a printed learning materials pack for schools and a roving Yuto Aquarium, which uses augmented reality to allow viewers to interact with dynamic digital display panels. “Shipping is one of the main economic pillars for Hong Kong, but the nature of the industry is that it doesn’t tend to shout from the rooftops,” Wesley says, and he is not the only one concerned about its low profile. “Shipping has a visibility problem,” says Jack Hsu, chairman of the Hong Kong Shipowners Association, from the office of shipping firm Oak Maritime, of which he is managing director. A model of its most recent acquisition, the US$60 million MV Tempo, takes pride of place in the office. The MV Tempo is owned by Oak Maritime, a Hong Kong shipping company. “Ships are only the ocean component of the industry,” explains Hsu, adding that most shipowners never see their vessels in Hong Kong. The 2,545 merchant ships listed on the Hong Kong register, which permits local and foreign-owned ships to fly the Hong Kong flag, are about five times the number of warships in China’s PLA Navy. Hsu says it’s the cluster of local businesses that these ships sustain in Hong Kong that makes them so important. “Our associate members are the service providers offering legal services, insurance, finance, arbitration, brokerage, surveyors, classification societies, [specialised engineers who certify the safety and standards of automated on board systems],” he says. A report by the Trade Development Council reveals that Hong Kong was the world’s seventh largest trading economy in 2016, and this was facilitated by the strong presence of shipowners, cargo owners, ship brokers, ship financiers, maritime insurers, lawyers and an efficient port. The so called “maritime cluster” is a sector that is growing despite the testing trading conditions that prevailed in the decade after the 2008 financial crisis. “The full range of services to build, operate, register and insure a ship are all within walking distance here in Hong Kong,” says Tim Huxley, founder of Mandarin Shipping. According to a government report submitted to the Legislative Council last year, the port and maritime industry contributes 1.3 per cent (HK$29 billion) of Hong Kong’s GDP and employs 88,000 people, which represents 2.3 per cent of total employment. More importantly, the port and maritime sector underpins the development of the trade and logistics industry, which accounts for 20 per cent of Hong Kong’s GDP and 20.4 per cent of total employment. More than 90 per cent of all imported goods in Hong Kong, from computers and furniture to cars – and the petrol that fuels them – arrives by sea. Yet the image of shipping just doesn’t seem to fit in with Hong Kong’s new aspirations to become a smart digital city, driven by science and innovation. Why Hong Kong’s container port may be in terminal decline, and what that would mean for a city that appears not to care Even the city’s port, the fifth busiest container port in the world, which recorded a throughput of more than 20 million TEUs (20ft equivalent container units), in 2017, an increase of 4.8 per cent on the previous year, is frequently dismissed as little more than a potential building site for public housing. “I think we need to do more promotion of the port to the Hong Kong public … people do not understand the port and its importance to the economy,” says Jessie Chung Wai-yin, chair of the Hong Kong Container Terminal Operators Association. Singapore is our competitor and its government is offering marine companies financial incentives to set up there because they know it creates jobsJACK HSU, CHAIRMAN OF THE HONG KONG SHIPOWNERS ASSOCIATION “Colleagues in Europe tell me that they are so proud of Rotterdam because it used to be the No 1 biggest port in the world. Now it’s not even in the top 10, but no one would dream of calling for the port of Rotterdam to be closed down,” says Chung. “It’s just ridiculous.” Huxley points out that there’s more than just Hong Kong’s port at stake. “Hutchinson Ports is one of the world’s biggest port operators, so it’s not just Hong Kong port but many others such as Harwich, Brisbane and Buenos Aires which are all controlled from here”, he says. Some shipping insiders express frustration in private that while theme parks merit financial subsidy from the government, the shipping sector – which facilitates the global trade on which the city’s prosperity was built – is forced to justify its existence. Tung Chao-yung (right), with President Chiang Kai-shek at the Presidential Palace in Taipei in 1964. The situation would have been unthinkable in the 1970s and ’80s, when business news headlines were dominated by the names of high-profile shipping magnates such as Sir Y.K Pao, founder of the World-Wide Shipping Group, C.Y. Tung, founder of Orient Overseas Line, and T.Y. Chao, founder of Wah Kwong Shipping. In March 1976, Newsweek magazine ran a profile of Y.K. Pao, dubbing him the “King of the Sea” when his fleet was more than three times larger than that of Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. “C.Y. Tung bought the largest man-made moving object ever constructed on the planet,” says Huxley, referring to the supertanker Seawise Giant. This feat of engineering put Hong Kong shipping in the international spotlight. At 458.45 metres, it was longer than the height of Hong Kong’s current tallest building, the International Commerce Centre. As shipping flourished in Hong Kong’s local laissez-faire business environment, rival ports including Singapore made concerted efforts to attract international shipping and maritime businesses. Jack Hsu is chairman of the Hong Kong Shipowners Association. “Singapore is our competitor and its government is offering marine companies financial incentives to set up there because they know it creates jobs,” says Hsu. In 2009, Hong Kong suffered the indignity of losing one of its oldest and best-known shipping companies, which moved its headquarters out of the city where it was founded. "

09 May 2018

Maritime programme in Malta over four days

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"The Malta Maritime Forum and the International Propeller Clubs, Italy joined forces to organise a four-day maritime programme in Malta. The Italian delegation was made up of 45 professionals from the maritime sector in Italy, including representatives from Genoa, La Spezia, Milan, Naples, Ravenna, Salerno, Taras, Trieste and Venice. It also included the director general of the Italian Ministry of Transport and Infrastructure. The main focus of the visit was a full-day conference held at the Maritime Museum on April 26, in collaboration with the Malta Maritime Forum and the participation of representatives from Transport Malta, as well as the Ministry for Transport, Infrastructure and Capital Projects. The conference covered various presentations addressing ports, shipping, logistics as well aseconomic developments. Speakers from the Maltese attendees included introductory addresses by Joe Borg, chairman of the Malta Maritime Forum, and by Jesmond Zammit, adviser to Transport Minister Ian Borg. The first session focusing on shipping was moderated by Michael Callus and a presentation followed by MMF CEO Joseph Bugeja, focusing on the Motorways of the Sea and their impact on the Maltese economy. Godwin Xerri, MMF board member and president of the European Shortsea Network, addressed the floor on short sea shipping from the ESN perspective. Capt. David Bugeja, chief officer and harbour master, Yachting Directorate, Transport Malta, Capt. Jesmond Mifsud, MMF board member and chief pilot, together with Carolina Borg, Malta Freeport Terminals manager, gave very interesting presentations regarding their respective operations as participants on the shipping panel. Ann Fenech, MMF board member, president of the Malta Maritime Law Association and member of the Comite Maritime International, gave a detailed presentation on the subject of properly regulated judicial sales of ships. Ivan Falzon, registrar general of Shipping and Seamen at the Malta Flag Administration – Transport Malta, took the opportunity to highlight the advantages resulting from registering vessels under the Malta flag. The Italian delegates covered various topics relating to ports and to the maritime and economic dimensions concerning Italy and Malta. They covered also such topics as a comparative analysis of two port models, a focus on flag framework and the views of the association of ship brokers and ship agents in Italy. During the visit to Malta, representatives from the Italian delegation, led by president Umberto Masucci and the Italian Ambassador to Malta, H.E. Dott. Mario Sammartino, were received at Auberge de Castille by Prime Minister Joseph Muscat, who was accompanied by his chief of staff Keith Schembri as well as James Piscopo, CEO and chairman of Transport Malta. The meeting with Dr Muscat was very constructive and it gave both sides an occasion to share and exchange views on many maritime topics of common interest. During the visit to Malta, the Italian delegates experienced a port tour, organised by Tug Malta, followed by visits to Malta Freeport, Palumbo Shipyards, Enemalta and Valletta Grand Harbour. The event included a reception and dinner at the Malta Royal Yacht Club where Dr Borg and Sig. Masucci exchanged mementos and addressed the Italian and Maltese delegates and guests."

08 May 2018

Uniting nations: developing maritime domain awareness for the ‘Blue Pacific’

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"Pacific island states face a pressing need to understand more about what’s happening in the waters that surround them and to work more closely to deal with threats and crises. Maritime security-related issues represent some of the most valuable areas for cooperation in identifying and countering behaviour ranging from the trafficking of people, drugs, small arms and other illicit goods; illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing; and other environmental crimes. As well, the safety of ferries and inter-island shipping are key issues in a region dependent on maritime transport, so safety of navigation and effective search and rescue are essential. And protecting marine ecosystems and resources is vital to food security, human health and economic well-being. This means it’s crucial to share information on marine incidents, oil spill responses, management and conservation of fisheries resources, marine pollution and coastal management. A key to addressing these challenges regionally and nationally is maritime domain awareness (MDA)—understanding what happens at sea. Information sharing, fusion and joint analysis allow countries to react faster to incidents and set regional priorities. The communique of the 2017 Pacific Island Forum acknowledged ‘the need to strengthen cooperation and information sharing in maritime domain awareness’. In 2017, Forum leaders endorsed the ‘Blue Pacific’ identity to re-capture the potential of the region’s shared stewardship of the Pacific Ocean. How will the region realise MDA? The Pacific is more advanced than many other regions that have initiated MDA, but national capacities are still very weak. To date there’s little evidence that much information has been shared between regional bodies responsible for maritime security, shipping, and maritime safety and protecting the marine environment. An important future building block will be the Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) surveillance centre in Honiara. It holds a maritime operational picture based on data provided through member states’ vessel monitoring systems, some high seas data from the Western Central Pacific Fisheries Commission, as well as ships’ automatic identification systems and long-range tracking and identification systems. There’s considerable capacity for operational information management and analysis at FFA’s surveillance centre. Many forums and bodies together have large sets of complementary data and experience. These include mechanisms under the Nuie Treaty, the FFA, the Pacific Transnational Crime Coordination Centre, customs automated systems and partnerships, as well as forums like the Pacific Immigration Directors Conference and the Pacific Islands Chiefs of Police. Many of these groupings have demonstrated what can be gained from information sharing. So where from here for regional MDA? What instruments will succeed? We make six suggestions. A useful first step will be to agree on a single point of contact (SPOC) for maritime security in each country. SPOCs are a very cost effective solution to disseminate and share information, discuss challenges and develop consent proposals for how to proceed in advancing other instruments. Identifying the right SPOC in each country will not be easy: it implies that one agency will be the lead. The right SPOC needs to be able to transmit information at the national level and ensure that it receives the required attention. The SPOC system forms the basis for a second measure that can be implemented with low cost and with few administrative, legal or diplomatic hurdles. Regular dialogues of the SPOCs and other maritime actors on MDA will assist in developing a shared understanding of priorities. Such dialogues enable pragmatic forms of operational cooperation and provide the basis for social bonds and trust. They provide transparency to planned activities, such as operations or capacity building. This model has been used successfully outside the Pacific. Examples include meetings addressing human trafficking in the Mediterranean, piracy off Somalia and the monthly awareness meetings of Singapore’s Information Fusion Centre. In the Pacific such meetings will be more difficult to organise and more costly considering the region’s size. But such costs can be reduced if meetings are held back-to-back with other events and maximum use is made of video and voice conferencing. A third measure for effective MDA would be more formal agreements that clarify expectations and provide basic operating procedures, possibly through memoranda of understanding. More structured instruments are codes of conduct, like the Djibouti Code of Conduct in the western Indian Ocean. When accompanied by action plans and activities, these are important regional frameworks. A fourth step for effective regional MDA is institutional arrangements for sharing and analysing information and organising responses. One model for such a regional centre is the Information Fusion Centre (IFC) based in Singapore. The IFC provides the maritime domain picture for the ASEAN countries and to all its other participating countries (maritime accidents as well as illegal activities) and services such as newsletters and advice to the shipping industry. The IFC includes international liaison officers seconded by interested states. These allow joint interpretation of the situation, as well rapid distribution to national authorities. While the ideas behind the IFC are relevant, it’s a costly undertaking. Arguably the Pacific would do better to take smaller steps and seek something on a lower scale developed out of the FFA’s surveillance operations centre. (One possible model for a regional maritime coordination centre, building on FFA’s surveillance centre, has been set out in ASPI’s special report, Australia and the South Pacific: rising to the challenge.) A fifth requirement is to embed activities in a broader maritime security framework, ideally through national and regional maritime security strategies. These have been successful in Europe and in Africa, ensuring the buy-in of political and other stakeholders. A strategy doesn’t necessarily have to be developed first, but should be progressed with any MDA structures. The sixth component for effective Pacific MDA is support from donors. In funding MDA, donors will, however, bring their own agendas, priorities and preferences for systems or structures. Australia will certainly be a pivotal partner working through the Pacific Maritime Security Program providing new patrol craft to many island states, and new commitments to provide regional aerial surveillance. France and non-regional donors such as the EU, Japan, Singapore, the UK and the US should also be involved in advancing regional maritime security arrangements. Each has made commitments and related initiatives that can be built upon. In working with donors, it’s essential that the island states start with their own vision, and develop their own strategy and priorities. The closer the Pacific countries can work together, the more they’ll be able to avoid duplication of effort or gaps in areas of least attraction for funding by donors. In developing the MDA architecture, the region needs to take an incremental approach that pursues realistic goals and ensures ownership and sustainability. Any architecture shouldn’t focus just on threats or crime. It should also ensure that measures benefit the larger blue economy and regional ocean governance. As we stress above, existing agreements and arrangements should be built upon wherever possible. There’s also a need to advance coordination of regional and/or sub-regional capacity-building exercises and training related to maritime security information sharing."

08 May 2018

Piracy incidents in Malacca Straits rise on year in Jan-Apr: ReCAAP

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"The number of piracy and armed robbery incidents in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore, or SOMS, was higher January-April than in the same period a year earlier, an anti-piracy watchdog said Tuesday. One incident and two attempted incidents were reported in SOMS over January-April, compared with one in the same period a year earlier, the Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships in Asia, or ReCAAP, said in its monthly report. All ships should exercise enhanced vigilance in SOMS, particularly at night, and file timely reports of any incidents to the nearest coastal state, ReCAAP said, adding that enforcement agencies must beef up surveillance and provide quick responses to such reports. Singapore is located along one of the world's busiest waterways, with close to 1,000 ships anchored there at any given time. A ship calls at Singapore port every two or three minutes, for a total of around 130,000 ships a year, making piracy-free maritime passage in the region critical. SULU-CELEBES SEA ADVISORY Three incidents of piracy and armed robbery on ships were heard in Asia last month, but there were no reports of abductions of crew in the Sulu-Celebes Sea or the seajacking of ships to steal oil cargoes, ReCAAP said. However, as the threat of crew abduction in the Sulu-Celebes Sea has not been not totally eradicated, ReCAAP said it maintains its earlier advisory issued 18 months ago that all ships should re-route from the area if possible. Otherwise, ship masters and crew are strongly urged to exercise extra vigilance in the Sulu-Celebes Seas and eastern Sabah region, it said. As of April 30, nine crew members from previous piracy attacks were still being held captive, it added. In the last two years, 61 crew members from several ships have been abducted, of which 28 have been released, 17 rescued and seven killed, the report said. In January, two abducted Indonesian fishermen were rescued in the Philippines. Billions of dollars worth of commodities move to and fro on commercial ships in the vicinity of the Sulu Sea, according to industry estimates. In mid-2016, Indonesia raised safety concerns about coal shipments to the Philippines after seven of its sailors were kidnapped. The stakes for tackling piracy in the Sulu-Celebes Sea are high. An estimated 55 million mt/year of goods transit these waters, according to shipping industry estimates. Of particular importance are Indonesian coal shipments from East Kalimantan to the Philippines; the country imports around 18 million mt/year coal, with more than 88% of it shipped from Indonesia. However, the security situation has been slowly improving since last year. ""The severity of incidents is relatively lesser this year and the last compared with 2009-16,"" ReCAAP said. Over January-April, 21 attempted and actual incidents were reported across Asia, down from 31 each during the same period last year and 64 in 2015, the report said. "

25 Apr 2018

ReCAAP ISC and RSIS Hold Piracy Roundtable

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"The Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships in Asia Information Sharing Centre (ReCAAP ISC) and the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS) have conducted a Maritime Roundtable co-moderated by Masafumi Kuroki, Executive Director of ReCAAP ISC and Amb. Ong Keng Yong, Executive Deputy Chairman of RSIS. The topic of discussion, “Is a Single Reporting Centre the Answer to Timely Reporting, and Prompt Response against Piracy and Sea Robbery?” drew on a feedback pertaining to the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (IMO MSC) Circular MSC.1/Circ. 1334. This circular recommends that ship masters report all incidents of piracy and sea robbery to the Rescue Coordinating Centre of the coastal states immediately. Notwithstanding, some sectors within the shipping industry feel the need to further simplify this reporting procedure. Held under the Chatham House Rule, participants of the roundtable included senior representatives from IMO; international and regional shipping associations such as the Asian Shipowners’ Association, BIMCO, INTERTANKO, International Chamber of Shipping, OCIMF, Singapore Shipping Association; maritime regulatory and enforcement agencies such as the Indian Coast Guard, Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency, Philippine Coast Guard, Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore, Thailand Maritime Enforcement Coordinating Centre, Vietnam Coast Guard; information sharing/reporting centres such as ReCAAP ISC, International Maritime Bureau, and Information Fusion Centre and RSIS, a research institute. The Maritime Roundtable acknowledged that whether or not a “Single Reporting Centre” was feasible, the welfare of seafarers and safety of sea lanes are important, and that piracy must be effectively addressed. The Maritime Roundtable also affirmed the importance of continuing to build the capacity of Coastal States to combat maritime crimes, as well as ways to continue to enhance the cooperation between the regional authorities and the shipping industry. “In developing the topic for discussion, ReCAAP ISC worked closely with RSIS and the maritime community,” said Masafumi Kuroki, Executive Director of ReCAAP ISC. “This roundtable provides us with an opportunity to facilitate a frank and open discussion on a ‘single reporting centre,’ which is an issue of keen interest to the shipping community. It underscores ReCAAP ISC’s commitment to bringing together stakeholders from regulatory and enforcement authorities and the shipping industry to hear each other’s perceptions and concerns on the topic. This mutual exchange goes a long way to foster better understanding, deepen cooperation, and enhance maritime safety for our seafarers.” Amb. Ong Keng Yong, Executive Deputy Chairman of RSIS, commented on the relevance of the roundtable: “I am happy that the event went well. This setting [of a roundtable] proves to be a useful avenue for open discussions and raising of difficult questions among relevant stakeholders. It is a good confidence-building initiative, which we should continue to support.” The ReCAAP ISC-RSIS Maritime Roundtable was held in conjunction with the Singapore Maritime Week 2018."

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