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09 May 2018

Inaugural Caribbean bunker workshop fuels green discussions

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"Greenhouse gas emissions and the challenge of meeting stringent global targets on sulphur and CO2 were centre stage during lively discussions as the Maritime Authority of Jamaica hosted the inaugural International Bunker Industry Association’s (IBIA) annual bunkering conference. Welcoming international and Caribbean delegates, MAJ Director General, Rear Admiral Peter Brady, said: “Jamaica is fortunate to host what could arguably be the first major global maritime fuel event after the IMO’s MEPC meeting last week, which has imposed the strict sulphur cap standards on maritime fuel. I dare say we may very well set not only the tone but also the spate of discussions on this delicate but inescapable matter” Entitled ‘Fuelling a New Era in the Caribbean’, the conference took place from April 17-19, 2018 at the Hyatt Ziva Hotel, Montego Bay, Jamaica. Its core aim was to highlight the growth and development of Jamaica’s bunkering industry among global players. Located at the heart of the Caribbean, Jamaica is ideally positioned to provide maritime and logistics services to the Americas. A training workshop, which was over-subscribed, was held on the first day, delivered by IBIA Board member Nigel Draffin and attended by bunker suppliers, operators, surveyors, and regulators, which focussed on technical and commercial issues including bunker disputes and LNG bunkering. It also considered today’s technology requirements and examined international practices. A tour of Jamaica’s Port of Montego Bay with its new LNG terminal concluded the packed programme. Vibrant and informative debates considered subjects ranging from the future for bunkering in the Americas and Caribbean to how to adapt to new rules and new fuels – particularly topical in the light of the IMO’s recently adopted strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The conference was officially opened by Dr the Hon. Andrew Wheatley, Jamaica’s Minister of Science, Energy and Technology and the Hon. Minister Robert Montague delivered the keynote address during the closing gala dinner. Captain Steven Spence, Director of Safety, Environment and Certification at the MAJ said: “This was an excellent opportunity for Jamaica’s bunkering sector to showcase its business to an international audience, with varied networking opportunities and access to international expertise.”"

24 Apr 2018

ITF welcomes partial victory as ICTSI signs new agreement with PNG dock workers at Lae and Port Moresby

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"The International Transport Workers’ Federation has welcomed a new union agreement that reinstates pay and conditions for workers at two union ports in Papua New Guinea, but concerns remain over the future of 213 workers still without a contract. The PNG Maritime and Transport Workers’ Union (PNGMTWU) has signed a Memorandum of Agreement with Philippine port operator International Container Terminal Services Inc. (ICTSI) following months of local, worker-led protest and international pressure. ITF president and chair of the ITF dockers’ section, Paddy Crumlin, cautiously welcomed the agreement and congratulated the union and its members, but he raised concerns over the future of the 213 workers still without a job offer at Port Moresby. “This Memorandum of Agreement is a significant victory for workers who were looking down the barrel of a 50 per cent wage cut,” Mr Crumlin said. “The ITF congratulates the PNGMTWU and its members for digging in and demanding the pay and conditions that PNG dockworkers have fought for over decades. “However the ITF remains concerned that 213 workers are still without a contract after receiving termination notices from the former concession holder at Port Moresby. The transition of these jobs to the new Motukea terminal needs to be urgently addressed by ICTSI.” The signing of this agreement shadows months of disruption, following the awarding of concession agreements to ICTSI for the operation of PNG’s two major ports in October last year, which had meant a cut in pay and inferior conditions for workers. “The ITF and its affiliate PNGMTWU have drawn constant international attention to this dispute and forced ICTSI to guarantee pre-existing wage rates, industry conditions and protections after the company had cut wages back to the legal minimum,” Paddy Crumlin said. “Trade unions across the world will now be watching to ensure that ICTSI honours all of its commitments in PNG, by protecting the jobs of existing dockworkers on decent pay and conditions."" Mr Crumlin said it was important to note that the new agreement also recognises the PNGMTWU as representative of the workforce and provides a mechanism to resolve disputes. “This sits in sharp contrast to ICTSI’s industrial relations practices elsewhere in the world. For this to be real progress ICTSI must extend this respect for workers’ across the entirety of the company’s global operations,” Mr Crumlin said. “The ITF is prepared to work with ICTSI to progress the fundamental rights of all workers across its global network, to end the exploitation of its global workforce, recognise trade unions and stop undermining the wages, conditions and safety of its workforce.” "

25 Mar 2018

Antwerp sets up maritime training institute in Brazil

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"The port of Antwerp is to make its know-how and expertise available to further professionalise the management of ports in Brazil. It will do this by among other things providing a special series of seminars in two already active training centres for maritime professionals in Brazil. The initiative is laid down in a Memorandum of Understanding that was signed on Tuesday this week by Marc Van Peel with among others Maurício Quintella, the Brazilian minister of Transport, Ports and Civil Aviation. The port of Antwerp has already applied a similar model successfully in India, where a special training centre for maritime professionals has been set up in the Indian port city of Mumbai. “Our training subsidiary APEC has demonstrable, relevant experience in training port professionals,” declared port alderman Marc Van Peel immediately after the signing. “Furthermore, Antwerp is a major trading partner for Brazil. Thanks to our services we will further develop this collaboration,” he concluded. Towards more modern ports Brazil has 45 publicly-owned ports and 131 private port terminals. The ports are crucial for Brazil’s foreign trade, with no less than 98.6% of its foreign exports passing through them in 2015. And yet much work needs to be done: the logistical infrastructure urgently needs to be modernised, as one of the most important factors for success in order to boost the economy and to keep the country competitive internationally. The ports are governed by the Ports Act of 2013 which among other things requires their modernisation. “It is against this background that APEC has been asked by the Brazilian ministry to make a wider contribution,” explains APEC managing director Kristof Waterschoot. “APEC is already well known in Brazilian port circles, as more than 660 maritime professionals from Brazil have so far attended a seminar or other training in Antwerp,” he continued. But the need is greater, and so Antwerp and Brazil have undertaken to reform two existing training institutes on the APEC model, on in São Paulo in the South and one in Alagoas in the North. This means that Antwerp will be responsible for among other things designing tailor-made courses and supplying lecturers. “In particular, dockers have to be specially trained. Antwerp already has a strong reputation for the high degree of professionalism of its dock workers, and so we will develop a tailor-made programme for dock labour in collaboration with the Antwerp training centre,” Waterschoot explained. Gateway to South America With an annual freight volume of 7.1 million tonnes Brazil is Antwerp’s seventh-largest trading partner. Ports such as Salvador, Santos, Paranagua, Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande generate large volumes of cargo with containers carrying deepfreeze goods and agricultural products, along with fuel derivatives and metal products going to and from. Indeed Antwerp has two local representatives to represent it in the Brazilian port community: Ricardo Sproesser and Henrique Rabelo. In summer last year the Port Authority’s other subsidiary, Port of Antwerp International, decided to invest 10 million dollars in Porto do Açu, the first private operational port complex in the North of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil’s industrial heartland. “Brazil is the main gateway to South America for the port of Antwerp, and thus for the many Flemish and European countries seeking to do business there,” emphasised port alderman Marc Van Peel. “It is therefore essential for us to have a presence here in many ways, in order to raise the name recognition of Antwerp as the ideal gateway to Europe.”"

25 Mar 2018

Antwerp sets up maritime training institute in Brazil

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"The port of Antwerp is to make its know-how and expertise available to further professionalise the management of ports in Brazil. It will do this by among other things providing a special series of seminars in two already active training centres for maritime professionals in Brazil. The initiative is laid down in a Memorandum of Understanding that was signed on Tuesday this week by Marc Van Peel with among others Maurício Quintella, the Brazilian minister of Transport, Ports and Civil Aviation. The port of Antwerp has already applied a similar model successfully in India, where a special training centre for maritime professionals has been set up in the Indian port city of Mumbai. “Our training subsidiary APEC has demonstrable, relevant experience in training port professionals,” declared port alderman Marc Van Peel immediately after the signing. “Furthermore, Antwerp is a major trading partner for Brazil. Thanks to our services we will further develop this collaboration,” he concluded. Towards more modern ports Brazil has 45 publicly-owned ports and 131 private port terminals. The ports are crucial for Brazil’s foreign trade, with no less than 98.6% of its foreign exports passing through them in 2015. And yet much work needs to be done: the logistical infrastructure urgently needs to be modernised, as one of the most important factors for success in order to boost the economy and to keep the country competitive internationally. The ports are governed by the Ports Act of 2013 which among other things requires their modernisation. “It is against this background that APEC has been asked by the Brazilian ministry to make a wider contribution,” explains APEC managing director Kristof Waterschoot. “APEC is already well known in Brazilian port circles, as more than 660 maritime professionals from Brazil have so far attended a seminar or other training in Antwerp,” he continued. But the need is greater, and so Antwerp and Brazil have undertaken to reform two existing training institutes on the APEC model, on in São Paulo in the South and one in Alagoas in the North. This means that Antwerp will be responsible for among other things designing tailor-made courses and supplying lecturers. “In particular, dockers have to be specially trained. Antwerp already has a strong reputation for the high degree of professionalism of its dock workers, and so we will develop a tailor-made programme for dock labour in collaboration with the Antwerp training centre,” Waterschoot explained. Gateway to South America With an annual freight volume of 7.1 million tonnes Brazil is Antwerp’s seventh-largest trading partner. Ports such as Salvador, Santos, Paranagua, Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande generate large volumes of cargo with containers carrying deepfreeze goods and agricultural products, along with fuel derivatives and metal products going to and from. Indeed Antwerp has two local representatives to represent it in the Brazilian port community: Ricardo Sproesser and Henrique Rabelo. In summer last year the Port Authority’s other subsidiary, Port of Antwerp International, decided to invest 10 million dollars in Porto do Açu, the first private operational port complex in the North of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil’s industrial heartland. “Brazil is the main gateway to South America for the port of Antwerp, and thus for the many Flemish and European countries seeking to do business there,” emphasised port alderman Marc Van Peel. “It is therefore essential for us to have a presence here in many ways, in order to raise the name recognition of Antwerp as the ideal gateway to Europe.”"

15 Mar 2018

Free trade zones are being used to traffic counterfeit goods, says OECD

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"Rapid growth in free trade zones – where economic activity is driven by reduced taxes and customs controls, light regulation and limited oversight – is unintentionally fostering growth in counterfeit goods trafficking, according to a new report by the OECD and the EU’s Intellectual Property Office. Trade in Counterfeit Goods and Free Trade Zones finds that exports of counterfeit and pirated goods from a country or economy rise in parallel with the number and size of free trade zones it hosts. Comparing growth in free trade zones, measured by the number of firms and employees in the zone, and customs seizure data from around the world shows that establishing a new free trade zone is associated with a 5.9% rise in the value of counterfeit exports from the host economy. “This is clear evidence that free trade zones are being used by criminals to traffic fake goods,” said OECD Public Governance Director Marcos Bonturi, launching the joint report with EUIPO Executive Director António Campinos at a meeting of the OECD Task Force on Countering Illicit Trade. “We want this to be a call for action, and we will be working in the months ahead to help free trade zones step up their efforts to stop illicit trade, while at the same time maintaining their role as facilitators of legal trade.” There are more than 3,500 free trade zones, often located at key ports, in 130 countries or economies in North and South America, the Asia-Pacific region, Europe and Africa, up from just 79 spread across 25 countries or economies in 1975. The special zones facilitate trade by offering businesses advantageous tariffs and lighter regulation on financing, ownership, labour and immigration, and taxes. They have helped emerging economies to attract foreign investment and generate jobs and growth, although they have also benefitted wealthier economies such as the United States, Singapore and Hong Kong. Another OECD report published earlier this month, Governance Frameworks to Counter Illicit Trade, pointed to poor oversight of free trade zones, insufficient screening of small parcels and inconsistent penalties on shippers of fake goods as three key areas where lax policy is facilitating trafficking of fake goods. As well as infringing trademarks and copyright, counterfeit and pirated goods entail health and safety risks, product malfunctions and loss of income for companies and governments. Earlier OECD work has shown that 2.5% of imported goods worldwide, and 5% of European Union imports, are fakes. "

02 Mar 2018

The CMA CGM BIANCA, largest ship to call in Cameroon (Kribi)

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"CMA CGM BIANCA (8721 TEUs), 335 meters long, becomes the largest ship to call in Cameroon A significant strengthening of our offer in the region with 4 new weekly services at Kribi Strategic hub to connect Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon (feeder service) New multimodal opportunities from Kribi to domestic destinations in Cameroon, Chad and Central African Republic The CMA CGM Group, a leader in maritime transport, is pleased to announce the start of its commercial operations at the Kribi Container Terminal. On this occasion, the CMA CGM BIANCA, 8721 TEUs and 335 meters long, became the largest container ship to call in Cameroon on 2 March 2018. 4 new weekly direct services The CMA CGM Group is deploying four new weekly direct services in Kribi to northern Europe, the Mediterranean and Asia. The services concerned are: EURAF 4, connecting the Mediterranean and West Africa with the following rotation: Marseilles, Barcelona, Valencia, Casablanca, Algeciras, Tangier, Dakar, Lome, Bata, Malabo, Apapa, Tincan, Onne, Kribi, Port Gentil, Libreville, Douala, Algeciras, Marseilles EURAF 5, connecting Northern Europe and West Africa with the following rotation: Antwerp, Le Havre, Lisbon, Algeciras, Pointe Noire, Luanda, Kribi, Douala, Abidjan, Algeciras, Antwerp ASAF, linking Asia and West Africa with the following rotation: Qingdao, Xingang / Tianjin, Busan, Shanghai, Ningbo, Nansha, Tanjung Pelepas, Singapore, Pointe des Galets, Cape Town, Pointe Noire, Kribi, Luanda, Cape Town, Port Kelang, Singapore, Qingdao West Feeder Service, connecting Kribi, Port Gentil, Boma, Matadi and Libreville Thanks to its strategic positioning, the Kribi hub will also significantly reduce transit times. Kribi, a major hub in West Africa for the CMA CGM Group Located in Cameroon, a growing market, the Kribi terminal aims to act as a major port in Cameroon in addition to Douala and as a hub by offering the Cameroonian supply chain a modern infrastructure adapted to the new generation of transoceanic vessels. The opening of Kribi is part of the strategy implemented by Rodolphe Saadé, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the CMA CGM Group, which aims to develop the Group's terrestrial and door-to-door activities in order to offer its customers a quality global transport offer backed by CMA CGM's global maritime network. The Kribi container terminal is jointly operated by CMA CGM, Bolloré Transport & Logistics and the Chinese group CHEC as part of a 25-year public-private partnership with the State of Cameroon. "

28 Feb 2018

CMA CGM continues its development in Latin America and launches 3 new services between Asia, Mexico and the West Coast of South America

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"Three new weekly services with shortened transit times Expanded port coverage: 17 ports served in Asia, Mexico and the west coast of South America 11 CMA CGM Group ships deployed The CMA CGM Group, a world leader in maritime transport, is pleased to announce it is reinforcing its offer, starting 4 April 2018, between Asia, Mexico and the west coast of South America in a partnership with COSCO and Evergreen. With 3 weekly and complementary services to those already operated by the CMA CGM Group, this new offer will provide expanded port coverage: 10 ports in Asia, 3 ports in Mexico and 4 ports among the largest of the west coast of South America. It will also reduce transit times, a strategic asset for our customers, especially producers of perishable goods and fresh fruits. With this unique offer, CMA CGM pursues its ambition to strengthen its service to South America ACSA 1 service Rotation: Kaohsiung, Hong Kong, Shekou, Ningbo, Shanghai, Busan, Manzanillo, Lazaro Cardenas, Buenaventura, San Antonio, Callao, Lazaro Cardenas, Manzanillo, Yokohama, Busan, Kaohsiung A service fully operated by the CMA CGM Group with 11 vessels Seamless connections with AZTECA and INCA weekly services of the CMA CGM Group to serve respectively Central America and Northern Chile markets A service specially designed for Reefer transportation of fresh fruits and perishable goods towards Asia ACSA 2 service Rotation: Xiamen, Yantian, Shanghai, Qingdao, Busan, Ensenada, Manzanillo, Callao, San Antonio, Lirquen, Manzanillo, Shanghai, Xiamen Seamless connection with the CMA CGM Group's INCA service A service designed for the transportation of wood and pulp from southern Chile to Asia ACSA 3 service Rotation: Hong Kong, Yantian, Kaohsiung, Ningbo, Shanghai, Manzanillo, Buenaventura, Callao, San Antonio, Hong Kong Seamless connection with the CMA CGM Group's INCA service A service specially designed for Reefer transportation of fresh fruits and perishable goods towards Asia These new services will benefit from the ""SERENITY by CMA CGM"" program, an innovative offering of additional and complementary services to deal with all kinds of unforeseen events during freight transport. This new offering is part of CMA CGM’s ""Customer Centricity"" strategy, which puts customers at the center of the Group’s development. This improvement of CMA CGM's offering between Asia, Mexico and the west coast of South America reinforces the Group's global coverage in order to meet customers’ expectations and needs. "

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