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14 Apr 2018

Global union leaders converge to condemn ICTSI

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"Global unions have once again condemned multinational port operator International Container Terminal Services, Inc. (ICTSI), for continuing to lower the standards in the global port industry. Several international unions and the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) general secretary, Steve Cotton, are in Melbourne this week to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the infamous Patrick Stevedores dispute, where dock workers were locked out of the waterfront in what was later determined to be an unlawful act. Steve Cotton said today: “Twenty years on from the iconic Patrick dispute where hundreds of workers were locked out of their workplace for weeks on end, it seems ICTSI has learnt nothing. “The right of workers to join a union and collectively bargain was upheld then and the same applies now. “Twenty years ago, we learnt that global solidarity between workers and their unions can make a difference with Patrick Stevedores eventually forced to reopen their gates and allow workers back on the job. “Yet ICTSI continues to intimidate its workforce and strip every hard-fought benefit that has been built up over dozens of years of collective bargaining by unionised labour. “The ITF has documented a pattern of labour rights violations from across ICTSI’s global network. Dock workers illegally sacked in Madagascar, workers paid poverty wages in Makassar, discriminating against union members in Melbourne, a worker fatally crushed in Jakarta. “Unions in South Africa have publically opposed ICTSI’s entry into Africa, the world’s fastest growing port market. Unions protested today in Melbourne, with the ITF calling on ICTSI to end the exploitation of its workforce, targeting of trade unionists, and undermining of their rights across the company’s global operations. “The ITF together with unions across the world, in every part of ICTSI’s global supply chain, will continue to campaign until ICTSI stops undermining the wages and conditions of its workforce. “The Patrick dispute showed us the power of global solidarity. If unions across the world – including those in the United States, Europe and New Zealand – had not stood shoulder to shoulder with their Australian brothers and sisters we may well have seen a different result. “We’ve learnt that lesson. The ITF, the newly amalgamated Construction Forestry Maritime Mining and Energy union, and our global affiliates stand in solidarity. We will tackle whichever operator we have to tackle, track whichever shipping company we have to track from any port, to pressure ICTSI to respect workers’ hard fought rights. “The ITF is committed to working with port operators who provide good jobs, have good industrial relations practices at their ports and prioritise the growth of their business through the development of long-term, functional relationships with unions as their social partners.”"

13 Apr 2018

ReCAAP ISC Reports Halving of Piracy Incidents in Asia During the First Quarter of 2018

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"A total of 14 incidents (comprising nine actual incidents and five attempted incidents) were reported in Asia during January-March 2018 compared to 27 incidents (comprising 21 actual incidents and six attempted incidents) during the same period in 2017. This accounts for a 48% decrease in the number of incidents reported during January-March 2018 compared to January-March 2017. Of the 14 incidents reported during January-March 2018, one was an incident of piracy and 13 were incidents of armed robbery against ships. The improvement of the situation during January-March 2018 was due to a decrease in the number of incidents at ports and anchorages in Bangladesh and Philippines. There was no actual incident of abduction of crew for ransom in the Sulu-Celebes Sea; and no incident of hijacking of ships for theft of oil cargo during January-March 2018. However, of concern was an attempted incident reported in the Sulu-Celebes Sea involving container ship, Kudos 1 on 16 Feb 18. In comparison, the incidents reported during January-March 2018 were less severe than incidents reported during January-March 2017. There was no CAT 1 and CAT 2 incidents reported during January-March 2018. Of the nine actual incidents reported during January-March 2018, three were CAT 3 and six were CAT 4 incidents. As for January-March 2017, of the 21 actual incidents, three were CAT 1, one was CAT 2, five were CAT 3 and 12 were CAT 4 incidents. During January-March 2018, several arrests of perpetrators and recovery of stolen items were reported. The ReCAAP ISC commends the authorities for their quick action in response to the ship’s timely reporting. In these incidents, the authorities were able to recover the stolen items; and arrest the perpetrators. The ReCAAP ISC encourages ship master and crew to exercise enhanced vigilance and make timely reporting of all incidents to the nearest coastal State and flag State; and enforcement agencies to provide quick responses to reports of incidents, and render assistance to victim ships."

13 Apr 2018

Firefighting continues on Maersk Honam as it is towed to Dubai

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"MSC has advised shippers and freight forwarders with cargo on the fire-stricken Maersk Honam that the vessel remains under tow for Dubai. There was substantial number of Maersk’s 2M alliance partner’s boxes on the vessel, which was deployed on an Asia-Mediterranean service. “Maersk Honam’s current position halfway between Muscat and Karachi, in the northern Arabian Sea. The vessel is still being towed to anchor at Jebel Ali, where cargo will be off-loaded,” it said in a customer advisory. It added that “firefighting and cooling operations are ongoing, with various hotspots remaining”. The continuing delay in docking the vessel, largely due to the ongoing firefighting, means shippers must continue to wait for information on the condition of their cargo, or what general average (GA) and security bonds they will need to prepare. “We will only be able to clarify the situation once the cargo has been discharged and inspected, but we can now provide to the owners of cargo stored in the holds 1 to 3 some certificate of total loss if requested,” said MSC. “For the other cargoes, insurers should prepare the required GA and salvage security bonds (when supplied by the general average adjusters), as those documents will be essential for the cargoes to reach their final destinations and be released under general average. “As the salvage operations are still ongoing, the general adjuster is not yet in position to finalise his request for salvage security bonds, but we will relay them to you as soon as known.”"

13 Apr 2018

UN body adopts climate change strategy for shipping

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"Member nations of the United Nations body charged with regulating shipping on the high seas adopted a first-ever strategy Friday to blunt the sector’s large contribution to climate change — bringing another major constituency on board in the international quest to cap the planet’s warming well below an increase of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit). The strategy embraced by a committee of the International Maritime Organization would lower emissions from container ships, oil tankers, bulk carriers and other vessels by at least 50 percent by the year 2050 vs. where they stood in 2008. The group also said that emissions from shipping should reach a peak, and begin to decline, as soon as possible. “IMO remains committed to reducing GHG emissions from international shipping and, as a matter of urgency, aims to phase them out as soon as possible in this century,” the group said. Nations meeting at the United Nations International Maritime Organization (IMO) in London have adopted an initial strategy on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships, setting out a vision to reduce GHG emissions from international shipping and phase them out, as soon as possible in this century. The vision confirms IMO’s commitment to reducing GHG emissions from international shipping and, as a matter of urgency, to phasing them out as soon as possible. More specifically, under the identified “levels of ambition”, the initial strategy envisages for the first time a reduction in total GHG emissions from international shipping which, it says, should peak as soon as possible and to reduce the total annual GHG emissions by at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008, while, at the same time, pursuing efforts towards phasing them out entirely. The strategy includes a specific reference to “a pathway of CO2 emissions reduction consistent with the Paris Agreement temperature goals”. The initial strategy was adopted by IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC), during its 72nd session at IMO Headquarters in London, United Kingdom. The meeting was attended by more than 100 IMO Member States. The initial strategy represents a framework for Member States, setting out the future vision for international shipping, the levels of ambition to reduce GHG emissions and guiding principles; and includes candidate short-, mid- and long-term further measures with possible timelines and their impacts on States. The strategy also identifies barriers and supportive measures including capacity building, technical cooperation and research and development (R&D). IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said the adoption of the strategy was another successful illustration of the renowned IMO spirit of cooperation and would allow future IMO work on climate change to be rooted in a solid basis. He told delegates, “I encourage you to continue your work through the newly adopted Initial GHG Strategy which is designed as a platform for future actions. I am confident in relying on your ability to relentlessly continue your efforts and develop further actions that will soon contribute to reducing GHG emissions from ships.” According to the “Roadmap” approved by IMO Member States in 2016, the initial strategy is due to be revised by 2023. But the United States “reserve[d]” its position on the strategy, with Coast Guard official Jeffrey Lantz, who headed the delegation to the London deliberations, saying that the country views “the establishment of an absolute reduction target as premature.” The United States also objected to how responsibilities would be divided between developed and developing countries, and expressed “serious concern about how this document was developed and finalized.” Shipping in recent years has been responsible for about 800 million tons annually of carbon dioxide emissions, according to Dan Rutherford, the marine and aviation program director of the International Council on Clean Transportation, who was in attendance for the deliberations in London this week. That means shipping’s emissions are 2.3 percent of the global total. “If you counted it as a country, it would be the sixth-largest source of CO2 emissions,” said Rutherford, noting that 800 million tons of annual emissions is comparable to emissions from Germany. And ships, by burning heavy fuel oil, create not only carbon dioxide emissions but also significant emissions of black carbon, or soot. Black carbon is a short-lived but powerful climate-change driver. Moreover, if nothing is done to halt emissions growth in the industry, emissions are projected to continue to grow, and shipping would burn up a significant share of the remaining global carbon emissions allowable under the Paris climate agreement — releasing as much as 101 billion tons of carbon-dioxide-equivalent emissions between now and 2075, according to an analysis by Rutherford’s organization. “The world’s shipping industry has now, for the first time, defined its commitment to tackle climate change, bringing it closer in-line with the Paris Agreement,” Tristan Smith, an expert on shipping and energy at the University College London energy institute, said in a statement. Shipping and aviation are two major greenhouse-gas-producing sectors that have sat rather uncomfortably in the context of the global push to cut emissions under the Paris climate agreement. Both sectors are very difficult to decarbonize, since they rely on energy-dense fuels to allow ships or planes to travel great distances without stopping. Meanwhile, since the sectors have major international components, they are not the responsibility of any single country to regulate as part of a domestic climate-change strategy. Instead, addressing their role in climate change has fallen to United Nations bodies such as the IMO and the International Civil Aviation Organization. Yet despite the ambition of the current strategy for shipping, Rutherford’s group’s analysis shows that it may not be strong enough. The group says that to be consistent with the Paris agreement, shipping should emit no more than 17 billion tons of carbon-dioxide-equivalent emissions from 2015 onward but that the current agreement implies emissions between 28 billion and 43 billion tons. (No action at all, meanwhile, could have meant 101 billion tons.) Groups that were pushing for something stronger included small island nations, which have the most to lose if warming exceeds 1.5 degrees Celsius, or 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit, since sea-level rise for these countries could be devastating. The Baltic and International Maritime Council, the world’s biggest shipping consortium, celebrated the agreement. “IMO has done something no one has done before: set an absolute target for emission reductions for an entire industry. It is a landmark achievement in the effort to reduce emissions, and something that every other industry should look to for inspiration,” Lars Robert Pedersen, the group’s deputy secretary general, said in a statement. For shipping to decarbonize, current fuel oils would have to be replaced by biofuels or, perhaps ultimately, hydrogen or batteries. But such innovations so far are being tested only in smaller ships, rather than the largest vessels, Rutherford said. “The largest container ships use a tremendous amount of energy. They’re going to be harder to electrify or put hydrogen in,” he said. A large emphasis will also certainly be placed on more energy-efficient designs to maximize the work performed by current fuels. The current document is referred to as an “initial strategy.” But from here, IMO is expected to move ahead with regulations for global shipping that will gradually require these carbon-saving changes to the industry. Those could include mandatory energy-efficiency requirements, speed limits or other measures."

13 Apr 2018

ICS Applauds 'Paris Agreement for Shipping'

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"The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) has welcomed the high level strategy for the further reduction of shipping’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, adopted on 13 April by the UN International Maritime Organization (IMO). ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe said “This is a ground breaking agreement – a Paris Agreement for shipping – that sets a very high level of ambition for the future reduction of CO2 emissions. We are confident this will give the shipping industry the clear signal it needs to get on with the job of developing zero CO2 fuels, so that the entire sector will be in a position to decarbonise completely, consistent with the 1.5 degree climate change goal.” He added “The agreed IMO objective of cutting the sector’s total GHG emissions by at least 50% before 2050, as part of a continuing pathway for further reduction, is very ambitious indeed, especially when account is taken of current projections for trade growth as the world’s population and levels of prosperity continue to increase.” ICS acknowledges that some governments would have preferred to see the adoption of even more aggressive targets, but argues that a 50% total cut by 2050 can realistically only be achieved with the development and very widespread use of zero CO2 fuels. ICS believes that if this 50% goal is successfully met, the wholesale switch by the industry to zero CO2 fuels should therefore follow very swiftly afterwards. ICS says that the efficiency goal that has been agreed by IMO Member States for the sector as a whole – a 40% improvement by 2030, compared to 2008, and a 70% improvement by 2050 – is also extremely ambitious but probably achievable. But only if governments recognise the enormity of this challenge and facilitate the rapid development of new technologies and fuels. Mr Hinchliffe remarked that “The industry is very encouraged by the willingness of governments, on all sides of the debate, to co-operate and move to a position that demonstrates unequivocally that IMO is the only body that can meaningfully address the CO2 emissions of international shipping.” ICS says it hopes the IMO agreement will be sufficient to discourage those who mistakenly advocate regional measures which, as well being very damaging to global trade, would not be effective in helping the international shipping sector to further reduce its total CO2 emissions, which are currently about 8% lower than in 2008 despite a 30% increase in maritime trade. As a result of the IMO agreement, ICS now expects discussions at IMO to begin in earnest on the development of additional CO2 reduction measures, including those to be implemented before 2023. ICS says that the shipping industry will continue to participate constructively in these important discussions."

12 Apr 2018

Bureau Veritas extends digital portfolio with ‘PSC Ready’ application

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"‘PSC Ready’ assists ship managers and their crews in planning and ensuring readiness for port state control inspections. ‘PSC Ready’ is a cloud-based and secure application, downloadable for both IOS and Android. The application helps ensure that ship owners are able to focus on all the requirements needed to be ready for PSC inspections. The benefits of ‘PSC Ready’ include: Helping ensure compliance with applicable requirements Enhancing ship maintenance by developing crews’ awareness of safety, environmental and employment requirements as well as those for ship structures and equipment The opportunity to improve PSC performance worldwide Training crews to detect, correct and avoid deficiencies Access to statistics, data and news on PSC developments ‘Check offline, report online’ functionality recognizing that data connections cannot always be available on-board The application enables PSC awareness to be shared across a company’s fleet, the sharing and analysis of records and performance with management and clients and the promotion of awareness of specific PSC concentrated inspection campaigns - all with access to the latest information about PSC areas of focus and interpretation. Laurent Leblanc , Vice President and Marine Operations Director, Bureau Veritas said: ‘We wanted to ensure that shipowners and their crews know what Port State Inspections require and to help them manage those requirements – all with a practical, digital, tool. This application provides the most up-to-date route to manage PSC planning and performance, enabling data and best practice to be shared on-board and across fleets.’ ‘Port state control is a major operational factor for shipowners and the bottom line is both safety and preventing unexpected operational loss of time and cost.’ ‘PSC Ready’ was developed and refined in pilot projects with shipowners world-wide. The version released today reflects their guidance, input, advice and feedback. It is available for download at Google Play and Apple’s Apps Store. "

12 Apr 2018

"Indian Register of Shipping (IRClass) receives authorisation as Recognised Organisation (RO) from Netherlands"

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"Indian Register of Shipping (IRClass), a leading classification society, has received authorisation as a Recognised Organisation (RO) from Netherlands’ flag administration. The authorisation comes just months after IRClass received authorisation from Europe’s largest flag Malta in December last year. Netherlands ranks fourth according to performance ranking released by Paris MOU. To date, IRClass has secured authorisation from four European flags including Latvia and Bulgaria – all within the past year or so. The RO code agreement was signed recently at a small event attended by Roeland Nieuweboer – Director, Inspectorate for Human Environment and Transport (ILT). Mr. P K Mishra, Vice President and Regional Manager – Europe and Americas said today: “This recognition is indicative of the growing presence of IRClass within Europe – towards becoming a globally-recognised classification society, and our commitment to provide prompt and value-added services to European shipowners.” He added: “With Netherlands added to the list of flags which have authorised IRClass, we are confident of securing authorisation from the other European flags, as well as expanding our business in the Northern European countries Press Release – Indian Register of Shipping 2 including Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Ireland, Lithuania, Norway, Sweden and United Kingdom.”"

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